James Flory's MEMORY-HOLED BOOK REVIEWS

The Majority is Always Wrong.

Category: Exposing Egregiously Erroneous Eschatology

COSMIC CONSPIRACY by Stan Deyo

This book has long been touted (since it first came out in the early 1980s) among the “Christian patriot” community as THE book which explains what UFOs are, maintaining that there are “two kinds” of UFOs and that one kind is the result of demonic activity and the other the result of super-secret government black operations projects. The author, Mr. Deyo, obviously knows his science, because his diagrams and descriptions of possible or likely UFO-type technology that the government side of things may possess seems eyebrow-raisingly plausible indeed, and quite elaborate. Still, it is strange that Mr. Deyo waits until the appendix of the book to finally begin explaining this technology, or even addressing it in any real depth.

Indeed, technical expertise aside, organizational or formatting skills do not seem to be a strong suit for the author. This seems very evident because the entire book is written in that amateurish style of alternating font sizes, alternating italics and bolded type, and alternating colored boxes around random paragraphs which so many amateurish writers fall into when they feel that mere, straightforward paragraphs in uniform, plain text don’t convey the incredible importance of what they are writing about. This hyperbolically formatted style of writing is much in vogue with amateurish “Christian patriot” writers and emailers. But this style of writing never lets the reader get into any kind of “rhythm” with the text: every next paragraph looks different from the last paragraph, and so the effect is that the reader gets distracted and can only read small portions at a time, say, while on trips to the toilet, where a book such as this can be chipped away at over a period of weeks–or longer–without engendering too much frustration upon the eyes.

Speaking of toilets and all things excremental, the greatest defect of this book, however, is in the theology of the author, for Mr. Deyo is, sadly, a “rapturist.” Mr. Deyo spends a great deal of time discussing the great (and bogus) “Rapture of the Saints.” Indeed, it is easily discernible that Mr. Deyo is getting his material on “the Rapture” straight out of the pages of Hal Lindsay’s The Late Great Planet Earth, complete with the whole “reestablishment of Israel in 1947 began the great prophetic countdown” thing.

Ugh. Yeah, good luck with that one.

Naturally, and quite predictably, Mr. Deyo at one point declares that the vaunted predispensational seven-year Tribulation would start and conclude within a small window of time in the near future. The problem is, that small window which the author predicts has already come and gone–about two decades ago. Equally predictable, Mr. Deyo states that he is against “date setting,” when he practically all but does just that.

Oh, those wacky Rapture cultists and their misadventurous hi-jinks.

In its defense, the book does have some good information on the Club of Rome and other secret societies, and it is interesting and quite a bit eerie to see how many times Deyo warns of a coming “New World Order” almost a decade before Daddy Bush first made the phrase almost a household word for even the unsuspecting average moron on the street.

Rating: Δ Δ
4/2010

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END TIME DELUSIONS by Steve Wohlberg

REVIEW: Wohlberg Explodes the Twin Towers of Dubious Doctrine: Futurism and Preterism

What a wonderful book this is. I can’t say enough. The only possible complaint I have against it is utterly trivial: that Wohlberg occasionally mixes his metaphors–but so what! This book is so simple to read, and so accurate in its understanding of Scripture, so crucially timely!

Seriously, having read fifteen or twenty books which deal with Biblical eschatology, all of which were laboriously constructed–either from the author trying to sound erudite, or from the author bending up Scripture to meet his outlandish eschatalogical view, or from both–I found this book by Wohlberg to be so simple a dumbed-down American high school student could read it, yet so powerful it could indeed be considered a “threat” to the dominant (and errant) eschatalogical views of popular culture today. But alas, this book would have to get into more hands for that to happen. I shudder to think of what’s coming for the Church in the near future because she is ignorant of–because she has forgotten–all that Wohlberg writes about here.
Wohlberg devastates both “pre-trib futurism” and “everything’s-already-over preterism,” exposing them both to be cunningly contrived deceptions from the imagination of the very antichrist which traditional, historical protestantism once already and universally identified, back when protestantism was vigilant and strong and faithful: that antichrist was the papacy. And as Wohlberg reminds us, every single Reformation forefather nailed down the system of the popes as the antichrist, no question about it. My how brainwashed has modern lukewarm protestantism become. My goodness, if you, like me, were one of those protestants who were brought up waiting for “the rapture,” or if you are now being infected with this absurd new outbreak of doctrinal disease called “preterism,” you will be flabbergasted by this. And if you overcome your emotional reaction and simply deal with the facts, you will be cured of your Scriptural errors and can embrace Truth.

Get End Time Delusions. Read it. Because chances are that you, like me, had never even been apprised of your true Christian heritage before: that the antichrist has already been identified; he is and has long been among us, and it is none other than that papacy, who fits the description of the “mother of all harlots” who is “drunk with the blood of the saints” and is clad in “scarlet and purple” and whose “wine” has made the nations “drunk with the cup of her fornication,” and on, and on, and on, the papacy fits all these and more Scriptural descriptions of the antichrist to unmistakable perfection. Protestants of today have almost been hypnotized–I dare say mind-controlled–into having their attention diverted away from the very papacy that once clobbered and massacred their forefathers, and now is all set to do it to them. My God, my God, does no one at all learn from history?–ever?

This is the only resource I yet know of that explains it this simply, yet so succinctly also: The Church is all set up to be completely blindsided by the Beast, and you my friend are letting it happen by your adherence to Jesuitical lies that you think are part of Christianity. If you are a pre-tribber, if you are a preterist, I challenge you to read this book and see where Wohlberg is wrong. Just keep this in mind: the history, and the history of the Church, are on WOHLBERG’S side.

Steve Wohlberg wrote this book to wake you up; to warn you. It’s not his fault if you don’t read it.

Now you have been apprised. Go get End Time Delusions by Steve Wohlberg and come out of her, my people!

Rating: Δ Δ Δ Δ Δ
5/2007

BEYOND THE END TIMES by John Noe

It is a credit to the author’s writing and organizational ability that this book is quite persuasive; and, because it is so persuasive, it will probably be the most alarming and most depressing eschatological exegesis that most Christians will ever read. For the author’s position is what’s known as “hyper-preterism,” which is the belief that:

A) There will be no future Second Coming of Jesus Christ; B) All of that “Second Coming” stuff already happened, only in “spiritual” or allegorical fashion, in 70 AD; C) This present world is now the “Kingdom on Earth” of which Christ foretold; D) This present world will last forever and ever; and E) There will be no physical resurrection of the Saints.

And this author, John Noe, is very effective in his elucidation of Scripture. Again, what Noe has to say, and how he convincingly explains it, makes this work quite alarming and depressing stuff for anyone with some semblance of just how evil is this present world in these (sorry, Mr. Noe) Last Days, especially in the ultra-occult governmental “high places” of which Paul spoke. Preterists like Noe, or anyone else expressing such obvious glee over the idea that this present world will last forever and ever, and that it’s up to pitiful human beings to “postmillenially” “perfect” this world—what this ought to tell readers who are not brainwashed by the modern media propaganda machine is that Noe, and anyone of his ilk, must necessarily have led very quiet, very comfortable, very insular lives; in short, it helps to be a preterist when you’ve led a cushy life mostly void of any serious adversity. Is it any wonder preterists are mostly numbered in America and in these modern technologically-inclined times? For anyone else with more than half a brain who is a Christian, we recognize the fact that, if these are the days of “the Kingdom” then something is drastically wrong, because Satan’s binding, everlasting chain is WA-A-AY too long. Noe must have no concept of the true nature of contemporary events. Blissfully and ignorantly believing that “every day in every way things are getting better and better,” preterists go through life with blinders on, whistling through graveyards, oblivious of the intensifying genocides, the intensifying satanic ritual abuses of children and government complicity thereof, the intensifying and murderous oppression of usury over all the world now, the intensifying global pandemics due to intensifying anti-scriptural vaccinations and intensifying food adulteration, the intensifying corporate totalitarianism, entire desert eco-systems being polluted with deadly radiation for centuries to come via U.S. depleted uranium shells, the intensifying and U.S.-sponsored global narcotics smuggling trade, etc., etc.

Truly, it must be really nice and cozy to be a preterist.

Sadly, another thing of which Noe apparently has no concept is the factual origin of his doctrine. For nowhere does Noe ‘fess up to the fact that the doctrine of preterism was first invented way back in the days of the blood-soaked Counter-Reformation Era by a Jesuit priest named Luis De Alcazar in an effort to distract Christians from focusing on the Papacy as the real system of Antichrist: such was their gall that even as these Jesuits and their Papacy were reeling with drunkenness from imbibing on the blood of the Saints, and still doing so obviously, did this Satanic system in the midst of all that Beastly behavior seek to shift the burden of evil away from themselves and onto long gone dead guys like Nero. Tragically, most evangelicals are oblivious of this history; tragically, Noe is apparently oblivious as to the Beastly origins of the system he is espousing. Either that or he’s a Jesuit himself.

The way that Noe can get away with allegorizing so much Scripture for so long in this work is by playing a little game of Orwellian semantics-smithing: He coins a term he calls “apocalyptic language” which is to designate the figurative language an Old Testament prophet used when prophesying; Noe maintains that all of Jesus’s prophesies about the “End Times” were likewise spoken in “apocalyptic language” and not to be taken literally.

Noe’s argument is rather convincing when you read it. But then, one thing I’ve noticed after reading about twenty-some-odd other books on eschatology: They’re all convincing, until you read the next guy’s book which completely blows apart the last book you just read, but then you read another book which completely devastates that book, and so on, and so on. I’m pretty sure God designed it that way, and I’m pretty sure Jesus Himself told us the reason why (Mt. 24:36). Nevertheless, you get these guys like Noe, who just seem to know it all, they’ve really got it all down, until we read the next cogent book on eschatology which will surely and completely refute him. And so it goes…

What obviously very well educated guys like Noe invariably lose grasp of when wrestling for so long over the minutest details of eschatological doctrines are the simple, straightforward, and purely rational arguments which in fact dynamite the whole elaborate structure they’ve spent so much time in designing.

For preterism can be refuted by a most basic line of questioning: Simply ask any preterist Christian whether or not God needs any secular source to accomplish anything. They must of course answer “No.” Then, ask them to show you IN SCRIPTURE where it is recorded that the Romans invaded Israel in 70 AD. They’ll hem and they’ll haw and they’ll answer that that history is not recorded in the Bible, but that we “know it happened” because “Josephus and other historians” recorded it for us. At this juncture, ask them the obvious question of whether or not “Joseph and other historians” are in fact SECULAR sources. Now, at this point, your preterist friend will be more than mildly peeved: he sees the trap closing around him, exposing the fallaciousness of his position, but his sinful fleshly nature may not be able to humbly admit it. If he doesn’t admit it, here’s where and how you may justifiably rebuke him: Ask him what kind of a heretical bogus doctrine it is that holds that the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, though it be the culmination of all God’s Plan for the world, can only be proven through secular worldly sources. At this final humbling point where reality should be starting to set in, your preterist buddy will likely pull one of those Jackie Gleason jibber-jabber routines (“Homina-homina-homina-!”).

So be it. We need to wake people up and rescue them from heresy when it is apparent. And heresy is all too apparent in John Noe’s bogus “sure-fire” “retro-eschatology.”

Rating: Don’t Bother
4/2008

SALT AND LIGHT by Bob Fraley

Pretty typical fare for so-called conservative evangelical Christians nowadays, which is to say, though the author is right in all that he warns about in terms of the decline in morals in America, he also nevertheless suffers from an over-emphasis on patriotism–bordering upon zealous nationalism–and, just as typical for teachers of the dispensational futuristic camp, Fraley is completely in the dark about true American history.

For example, though it is now an established fact that FDR and certain of his Cabinet, as well as General Marshall and certain others in high places, knew days if not weeks in advance that the Japanese were going to attack Pearl Harbor in 1941, Fraley still writes of the event as though it was the surprise attack that mainstream corporate disinformation sources would like us to continue to believe in. Fraley also believes the Founding Fathers were largely Christians, instead of the freemasonic-deistic lawyers they actually were: This is a common misconception indeed among evangelicals who are still drinking in their news at the mainstream slop trough, be it the mainstream “right” OR “left.” That’s just a dialectical game that’s played on us, and evangelicals are excellent at falling for it, the “god of the air(waves)” has them right where he wants them: in idolatrous patriotic war-mongering mode, puffed up with idolatrous ancestor-worshipping patriotism and a false history they have been fed by Jesuits and jesuit temporal coadjutors for many, many decades now.

In the so-called “Information Age” it is so tragic to see “conservative” evangelical teachers still confusing the true, SEPARATIST Christianity of the Pilgrims with the lying-in-wait, secret-society shenanigans of the “Founding Fathers” whose ilk followed the Pilgrims here and corrupted the place, so appallingly soon after the century-long ban on lawyers that the Pilgrims had originally enacted and for good reason. Only in so apotheosizing the “Founding Fathers” and their mythological deeds can Fraley conveniently gloss over this nation’s long, sordid history of men-stealing against Africans and fraud and genocide against the North American Indians, many of these latter having been in the process of being converted to Christ by at least some of the SEPARATIST Pilgrims and the PACIFIST Moravians until all the rich white lawyers and scribes arrived on this continent from the Old World and brought with them their love of ill-gotten gain and their ultimate kowtowing to the Papacy.

The bottom line: Fraley is right in stating that God has used America’s wealth and sufficiency for certain among its population to spread the Gospel of Christ, but he is wrong when he considers that, somehow, America is or at least was a “Christian nation.” That’s baloney; it’s always been baloney. That’s cowboys-and-indians stuff that honestly educated youths should have grown out of by the time they get to be earnest adult Bible readers. This secular nation is and has been consistently evil, just like any other secular nation is and has been consistently evil. Read your KJB or Tyndale Bible and see for yourself what God has to say about ALL nations upon the Earth.

Fraley also misunderstands the present nation of Israel, seeing it too as somehow “God-breathed,” as his tribe of dispensational teachers must needs do. All the usual pre-trib misunderstandings are here, and all because, like most evangelical pre-tribbers nowadays, this author too has had his history whitewashed out from under him and he doesn’t even realize it. He doesn’t know where the rapture doctrine came from (the Jesuits), he doesn’t know the real sordid history of the modern state of Israel, just like he doesn’t know the “Founding Fathers” were a bunch of elitist lawyer types who sold us common folk out to the King of England to save their own fat butts and huge estates (see: THE UNITED STATES IS STILL A BRITISH COLONY by James Montgomery, among others).

As purely a call for this nation to stop being grossly immoral in these Last Days, the message of this book is true and just enough. But once Fraley tries to get into detail and into history, factual truth and sound doctrine are likewise destroyed for lack of knowledge.

Rating: Δ Δ
6/2008

THE COSMIC CONSPIRACY by Stan Deyo

This book has long been touted (since it first came out in the early 1980s) among the “Christian patriot” community as THE book which explains what UFOs are, maintaining that there are “two kinds” of UFOs and that one kind is the result of demonic activity and the other the result of super-secret government black operations projects. The author, Mr. Deyo, obviously knows his science, because his diagrams and descriptions of possible or likely UFO-type technology that the government side of things may possess seems eyebrow-raisingly plausible indeed, and quite elaborate. Still, it is strange that Mr. Deyo waits until the appendix of the book to finally begin explaining this technology, or even addressing it in any real depth.
Indeed, technical expertise aside, organizational or formatting skills do not seem to be a strong suit for the author. This seems very evident because the entire book is written in that amateurish style of alternating font sizes, alternating italics and bolded type, and alternating colored boxes around random paragraphs which so many amateurish writers fall into when they feel that mere, straightforward paragraphs in uniform, plain text don’t convey the incredible importance of what they are writing about. This hyperbolically formatted style of writing is much in vogue with amateurish “Christian patriot” writers and emailers. But this style of writing never lets the reader get into any kind of “rhythm” with the text: every next paragraph looks different from the last paragraph, and so the effect is that the reader gets distracted and can only read small portions at a time, say, while on trips to the toilet, where a book such as this can be chipped away at over a period of weeks–or longer–without engendering too much frustration upon the eyes.

Speaking of toilets and all things excremental, the greatest defect of this book, however, is in the eschatology of the author, for Mr. Deyo is, sadly, a “rapturist.” Mr. Deyo spends a great deal of time discussing the great (and bogus) “Rapture of the Saints.” Indeed, it is easily discernible that Mr. Deyo is getting his material on “the Rapture” straight out of the pages of Hal Lindsay’s The Late Great Planet Earth, complete with the whole “reestablishment of Israel in 1947 began the great prophetic countdown” thing.

Ugh. Yeah, good luck with that one.

Naturally, and quite predictably, Mr. Deyo at one point declares that the vaunted predispensational seven-year Tribulation would start and conclude within a small window of time in the near future. The problem is, that small window which the author predicts has already come and gone–about two decades ago. Equally predictable, Mr. Deyo states that he is against “date setting,” when he practically all but does just that.

Oh, those wacky Rapture cultists and their misadventurous hi-jinks.
In its defense, the book does have some good information on the Club of Rome and other secret societies, and it is interesting and quite a bit eerie to see how many times Deyo warns of a coming “New World Order” almost a decade before Daddy Bush first made the phrase almost a household word for even the unsuspecting average moron on the street.

Rating: Δ Δ
4/2010

THE GREAT ECCLESIASTICAL CONSPIRACY by George Davis and Michael Clark

I have gone back and forth with this book, and this is the third and (I hope) the final review of it that I shall write. It is truly an exasperating book because, on the one hand, the authors make some very good points in showing that King James apparently did indeed have some of his elite croney-scholars on the 1611 translating committee gently tweak a bit of the language here and there ostensibly in order to subtlely enhance the position of the church hierarchy of England as well as the monarchy. Here are a couple of the very intriguing points these authors raise:

1) William Tyndale, whose New Testament translation set the stage for the King James, had only used the word “church” twice, and both times Tyndale had used it to mean a pagan temple! Tyndale instead used the word “congregation” in all the other verses in which the King James Bible uses the word “church.”
2) The King James translaters several times inserted the words “office of” in front of words like “bishop” or “deacon.” Nowhere in the original Greek Text is there anything resembling or calling for the insertion of those words.

However, these authors also tend toward the duplicitous, sometimes cleverly steering the reader to make conclusions that are not accurate. One evidence of this occurs in chapter two where these authors cleverly use the structure of their text to imply that Tyndale did not use the word “bishop,” and that only the King James Bible uses the word “bishop.” But then, upon checking back with the Tyndale New Testament, it is found that Tyndale also uses the word “bishop” for the verses cited, even in the Ye Olde English. Now, a more careful second or third read shows that nowhere did these authors explicitly state that Tyndale did not use “bishop,” but any casual reader encountering chapter two of this book will and must indeed come away expecting that Tyndale must not have used that word at all, and it must only occur in the KJV, because the implication here is that preponderant. This is not the action of someone writing with an honest spirit, and it taints the rest of this work.

Of greatest importance, though, in all the decrying over what King James probably did, nowhere is there a warning that people not then choose the new, bogus, Alexandrian counterfeit “bibles” instead. The NIV, NASV, RSV, ESV, LB, NKJV, etc., are NOT the real Bible. They are gnostic/Romanist counterfeits, and readers should have been warned of that here, and they are not. Thus, this book is irresponsibly dangerous in the hands of someone not knowledgable of the Alexandrian vs. Antioch manuscript history.

Rating: Δ Δ
12/2012

APOLLYON RISING 2012 by Tom Horn

The good: The book is well written and contains some quality esoteric information on freemasonry and the freemasonic architecture of Washington D.C.

The bad: Everything else: 1) He blames the totalitarian formation of the occultic New World Order on everybody’s favorite whipping boy, the freemasons. Sure, why not, it’s much safer to blame them. Just ask Dr. Stan;  2) He constantly cites his pre-trib cottage-industry cronies as valuable and trustworthy sources of important information, such false teachers as Chuck Missler, the Gilberts, etc. Yeah, that crowd of fellow self-affirming, pre-tribby podcasters and book peddlers;  3) He is an author who writes what he writes, first and foremost, simply to make a living, and the fact that he may feel that what he is writing about is important information that the public needs to know about is obviously of secondary importance here—one gets the distinct impression in reading Horn and his ilk that if any and all profit margin was taken away from what he’s doing, then he would just as soon go seek something else to do instead that would bring in some kind of profit;  4) The subject matter here is all spooky, ooga-booga Nephilim stuff, based on nothing but pure pre-tribby conjecture which rests upon a foundation of biased, pre-tribby eisegesis of bogus “bible versions” and dubious apocryphal books of debatable antiquity and unsure authorship. It’s the sort of purely speculative, Armageddon-gothic sensationalism that holds conspiracy-minded pre-tribbers mesmerized nowadays and unable to focus on more serious, more pressing, and more concrete realities and histories which menace them in these times in every facet of their lives, all of it unseen by them, of course, because they are so mesmerized by said spooky sensationalism;  5) Horn, like Hal Lindsay and other false teachers, shows himself to be an unscriptural “date-setter”;  6) Even as the Chuck Misslers and Gary Norths of the evangelical world once played up and profited from the bogus Y2K scare, Horn likewise plays up and profits from the latest doom-and-gloom sensationalistic fad, the Mayan-Calendar 2012 scare.

The ugly: Horn begins slipping in references to Roman Catholic sources about 1/3 of the way through the book, treating them as though they were authorative, “Christian” sources of information, and this practice he slowly increases with good subtlety as the book goes along, until he closes the last few pages of the book with much ado about the writings of Malachi Martin and other more ancient Romanist false teachers, always inferring that these are somehow authoritative. Horn even begins using Romanist language when he refers to practicing Holy Communion as practicing “the Eucharist.” Horn also deceptively refers to the Vatican-controlled Knights of Malta as being “masonic-connected”–as if that would be anywhere near as important as the fact that they are controlled by the Vatican. Ugh. Quite the stinkbomb of disinfo here.

Rating: Δ
10/2011