James Flory's MEMORY-HOLED BOOK REVIEWS

The Majority is Always Wrong.

Category: Big-Agri Shakedown

NIGHT CAME TO THE FARMS OF THE GREAT PLAINS by Raymond D. North

Two government agencies, the so-called “Federal Land Bank” system, and the Farmer’s Housing Administration, were established in the latter part of the 20th century in order to overdose unwitting American farmers with credit. The latter institution was particularly insidious and, like the equally insidious Federal Reserve Bank, deliberately obfuscated the question of whether it was a private bank or a federal institution. Both institutions extravagantly waste gigantic amounts of taxpayers’ money.

A radically different method of loaning money to farmers was pursued with vigor by these rapacious agencies, especially after 1971: the novel idea of encouraging the farmers into engaging in something euphemistically labeled “cafeteria credit.” In other words, allowing–and deceitfully goading–a farmer into borrowing as much money as he wanted, whenever he wanted, for whatever he wanted, without concern or counsel as to whether the farmer could actually pay back the money–in other words, deliberately overdosing the farmer with credit. More traditional and more responsible lenders to the farming community were forced out of the game and stopped lending to farmers altogether when the federal government got involved and started recklessly throwing taxpayers money around.

When the inevitable day of reckoning came that great multitudes of these duped American farmers defaulted on the exorbitant loans, the Federal Land Banks and most especially the FmHA duly and ruthlessly foreclosed, vast speculative moneys owed upon greatly overinflated real estate appraisals would have to be recouped from the poor American taxpayers and their posterity, and great multitudes of American wheat and other farmers were forced off the land, forced into citified living conditions and dependent on public assistance and charity–those distraught former farmers that didn’t summarily commit suicide, that is (and the author makes it clear that there have been quite a few of those). Truly, on Judgement Day, it won’t be the serial killers who will have it the worst; truly, it will be the Banksters who will have it the worst before Our Lord.

By the way, the process just described isn’t all that different from what went down in the U.S.S.R. back in the 1930s: Get the people off the land and into the cities, and consolidate the production of agriculture into as few hands as possible. It’s all right there in the 10 Planks of the Communist Manifesto, if anybody wants to check. (Incidentally, the trick of overdosing the American people with “cafeteria credit,” waiting for them to take the cheese and then snapping shut the trap and foreclosing, also sounds eerily similar to the most recent boom-and-bust great housing bubble in the U.S., for those who are paying attention.)

So for anyone out there who, like this reader, was also scratching his head back in the 1980s over the whole Willie-Nelson-Farm-Aid thing, wondering why all of a sudden American farmers were inexplicably going belly-up en masse, this is the book that finally explains it all, and in relentlessly specific and often poignant detail.

It is an exquisitely informative read. The one and only flaw here is that the author suffers under the unwarranted supposition that what he is describing is largely the result of ineptitude. But this reader doesn’t see it that way. For this reader, the scenario the author describes can only have been the result of an orchestrated strategem carried out by a few super-elite oligarchical string-pullers.

Rating: Δ Δ Δ Δ
10/2012

FOOD POLITICS by Marion Nestle

Marion Nestle is an academic nutrition consultant. She spent many years as an advistor on nutrition committees seeking to work with the federal government to develop “official” federal standards of nutrition and all of the legalese mumbo-jumbo on food labels that that entails. Nestle is quite the logistician, and the vital statistics and the specific recent historical events that Nestle provides is impeccable and thorough; unfortunately, Nestle also writes like a logistician, and readers of her book will likely and quickly get bogged down in the reams and reams of specifics and statistics she piles and compiles upon point after point, event after event. This book was apparently very influential, as it was written in 2002 and, since that time, many other books and documentary films on the same or similar food industry-related topics have been made–books from more accessible authors like Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser, for example, and documentary films such as Food, Inc.

Perhaps the most memorable section of this book occurs early on, when Nestle provides an in-depth history on the ridiculous and sundry attempts all throughout the twentieth century of the federal government to establish an accurate “food pyramid” icon with which to sell to the public. The process was hopelessly fraught with bribery and fraud on the part of corrupt corporations, their corrupt lobbyists, and their corrupt politician-lackeys. This long, sordid, and absurd episode sets the pattern for rest of the episodic food industry-related histories which Nestle provides on every subsequent, tediously documented page. In every case, regardless of the federal nutrition program or regulation, regardless of the commercialized food product, human greed and political corruption destroyed any and all efforts to provide an honest federal nutrition guidance program. (This book goes a long way towards explaining the problem of obesity in this country. That it does indeed.)

Nestle suffers from a couple of popularly accepted delusions, unfortunately: 1) She believes in the mainstream “cholesterol myth” (see the work of Dr. Weston Price or the work of Sally Fallon for the real deal here), and, despite all the gads and gobs and endless examples of political and corporate American food industry corruption ad nauseam, she remains naively hopeful that there can still someday be some sort of solution to the problem if only the right people just keep beating their heads against the right wall. (Gee, where have I heard that one before?)

Yeah, right. Good luck with that one.

Avoid the whole damn thing: Grow and raise your own food. If you don’t have the land to do so, then at least buy local. Go to farmer’s markets instead of supermarkets whenever possible.

Rating: Δ Δ Δ
5/2012

THE OMNIVORE’S DILEMMA by Michael Pollan

Impeccably written and researched, this is one man’s investigation of the average omniverous American’s diet. Pollan begins by conducting several thorough and quite impressive investigations, and he combines a lot of actual firsthand footwork with a lot of scientific book knowledge: the first of these investigations looks at the commercial corn industry. Once a person reads this–even an average dumbed-down American–that person will think twice about ingesting the myriad industrial items into which industrialized corn has been transformed.

In short, that person will, after reading this, suddenly begin actually reading the ingredients on the packaged, processed groceries he is buying. Pollan also shows how ludicrously inefficient is our civilization’s unnatural dependency upon corn, rather than a more diverse diet including other grains. But other grains would not ensure the massive amounts of profit and control for the great agribusiness companies, hence the exploitation of corn at the expense of the health of both the land and consumers’ bodies.

Pollan then embarks upon a rigorous investigation of the beef industry. What he reveals about feedlot cattle–the source of nearly all available beef in any modern American grocery store–should and will sicken the reader.

From there, Pollan transitions to a close examination of the budding organic farming industry, and what he finds regarding the standards of “organic” farming is alarming: He finds that, as the move towards organic gains in popularity, the same mercenary controlling factors that set up the standards that polluted industrialized food is also doing the same for organic, bringing down the health and nutritional standards in a constant pursuit of more commercial profit.

The last chapters in book feature the author endeavoring to hunt and forage for his own food. Pollan conducts fascinating foraging outings for different types of edible wild mushrooms and provides much mycological scientific knowledge along the way. These outings are conducted mainly in northerncalifornia, which is also where Pollan hunts down and kills a wild pig. Pollan, a decidedly “citified” fellow, reveals his squeamishness in shooting, and especially in dressing the pig. He reminds us that meat, if we are to consume it, requires that something die. He then engages in a few philosophical discussions with the written work of some animal rights activists.

Ultimately, Pollan comes up empty in his rationale for consuming meat, falling back mainly on the fact that he likes it, and since man is at the top of the food chain, it ought to be acceptable for man to eat animals. Unfortunately, Pollan, who is obviously not a reader or believer of Scripture, is not able to understand the real reason for death and the justification for being a carnivore that the Bible offers.

The book concludes, fittingly enough, with Pollan cooking up a grand meal made up almost entirely of menu items which he has either hunted down or foraged for, which he then shares with the friends he has met along the way during his hunting and foraging excursions. Ultimately, Pollan calls for a more localized food production system in our society. Again, as he is coming from a spiritually bereft, materialistically minded position, he doesn’t realize that what he is calling for is exactly the form of responsible local agriculture and husbandry that is called for in God’s Word.

This book is mostly of interest to those who want to learn more about where most food comes from nowadays inAmerica, and what kind of quality and sanitary controls (or lack thereof) are maintained along the way. It serves as a fine excoriation of our modern American agribusiness and agrihusbandry industries.

Rating: Δ Δ Δ Δ
4/2009

THE CRAZYMAKERS by Carol Simontacchi

This book highlights the deleterious nature of the average modern American’s diet. It discusses and documents the dangers of such purely modern food additives such as refined sugar, superabundant sodium, monosodium glutamate and other excitotoxins such as aspartame, manifold food preservatives such as nitrites and nitrates, etc., and so on. The author focuses on the effects all of of these food additives have on the human brain; she categorizes these effects on the brain according to various and obvious stages of human development. In addition to documenting and emphasizing the dangers of these food additives, the author also provides much information on what an average healthy diet should resemble. There are even handy, health-conscious recipes in the back of the book. The author does a particularly fine job of exposing how public schools and producers of packaged food for vending machines are systematically reaping great profits from knowingly poisoning young people’s brains and bodies with addictive, nutritionless, pernicious junk food; however, perhaps the single most memorable piece of information here appears in one of the author’s source citations, when, early in the book, she cryptically refers to the Jesuits as having first furnished the North American continent with refined sugar. The reader wishes the author had pursued this magic portal of unknown history a little further; however, this is understandable, as the author is a dietician and not a historian, and her clear focus of investigation is laid out accordingly.

The author provides useful information on several key vitamins that all humans should have in their diet, too.

Bottom line: This is an informative dietary resource, but a lot of this information should already be obvious to those already weaned away from the mainstream media disinformation system. That said, there is specific dietary information here that should be useful to all.

Rating: Δ Δ Δ Δ

THE UNTOLD STORY OF MILK by Ron Schmid

One of the most significant health-related books that any American could read today. Ron Schmid documents the memory-holed history of milk, first in the ancient to not-so-ancient world, and then to examining colonial America to present America. The history of raw milk, versus the history of pasteurized milk, is compared and contrasted; likewise, the health benefits of raw milk, versus the health risks of pasteurized milk, are compared and contrasted. Contemporary scientific and legislative facts about raw milk vs. the pasteurized stuff are discussed in depth as well. Most readers will be utterly shocked by what they are confronted with here: They will be forced to see that, unlike the propaganda of the mainstream corporate-controlled media, it is pasteurized milk that poses a deadly and ever present danger to the public, not certified raw milk.

This is history, and these are scientific nutritional facts, that the small and powerful monopoly of pasteurized dairy corporations in America do not want you to know about. A man who reads this book will likely never purchase nor drink pasteurized milk again as long as he lives. But, even more surprisingly, a man who considers himself not to be a milk-drinker, upon reading this book, will likely seek out and regularly drink certified raw milk for the rest of his life. Yes, this is one of those rare “life-changing” books. It is perhaps not an overstatement to say that if every American were to read this book, even as dumbed-down as most Americans are today, then the entire pasteurized dairy monopoly of North America would all go out of business in a month’s time.

Schmid, the author, is a naturopathic physician. We need more naturopaths. Only a physician outside of  the Rockefeller-controlled, petro-chemical medical establishment could write a book like this. The factual history in this book is either denied or, more likely, altogether unknown to most allopathic physicians and nutritionists; the scientific-nutritional facts in this book are either erroneously denied by them or, more likely, ignored altogether. To read that the prestigious Mayo Clinic once regularly prescribed a dietary regimen of nothing but raw milk to patients with a wide variety of chronic illnesses as late as the 1920s, and how this “Milk Cure” proved remarkably efficacious for nearly all of these patients, is truly startling stuff, and it should be so, for the historian of today, for the physician of today, as well as for the nutritionist of today.

This is a truly superlative work!

Rating: Δ Δ Δ Δ Δ
12/2011

THE CRAZYMAKERS by Carol Simontacchi

This book highlights the deleterious nature of the average modern American’s diet. It discusses and documents the dangers of such purely modern food additives such as refined sugar, superabundant sodium, monosodium glutamate and other excitotoxins such as aspartame, manifold food preservatives such as nitrites and nitrates, etc., and so on. The author focuses on the effects all of of these food additives have on the human brain; she categorizes these effects on the brain according to various and obvious stages of human development. In addition to documenting and emphasizing the dangers of these food additives, the author also provides much information on what an average healthy diet should resemble. There are even handy, health-conscious recipes in the back of the book. The author does a particularly fine job of exposing how public schools and producers of packaged food for vending machines are systematically reaping great profits from knowingly poisoning young people’s brains and bodies with addictive, nutritionless, pernicious junk food; however, perhaps the single most memorable piece of information here appears in one of the author’s source citations, when, early in the book, she cryptically refers to the Jesuits as having first furnished the North American continent with refined sugar. The reader wishes the author had pursued this magic portal of unknown history a little further; however, this is understandable, as the author is a dietician and not a historian, and her clear focus of investigation is laid out accordingly.

The author provides useful information on several key vitamins that all humans should have in their diet too.

Bottom line: This is an informative dietary resource, but a lot of this information should already be obvious to those already weaned away from the mainstream media disinformation system. That said, there is specific dietary information here that should be useful to all.

Rating: Δ Δ Δ Δ

FARM CITY by Novella Carpenter

Written in disarming, unassuming first-person autobiographical form by an urban west coast farmer with a natural gift for writing, and who has obviously honed her writing craft, this makes for an enjoyable read at the very least. More than that, however, the book often provides a lot of practical advice for modern American readers on how to grow and raise their own food and be less reliant on the unhealthy mainstream corporate-agricultural food grid. In her narrative, Carpenter records all her failures as well as her successes, and as she learns, so does the reader. A lot of readers will question the author’s wisdom in her choice of neighborhoods: Of all places to transform herself into an “urban farmer,” she chose the post-apocalyptic concrete gloom of Oakland, California. Interestingly, she does point out some of the benefits to being a non-conformist in a place like Oakland: In such urban wastelands, the authorities tend to care less what the inhabitants do, and so the bureaucrats and the police leave people alone more than they would in an artifically pristine city like a Seattle (from where the author had moved) or a San Francisco. As real estate in places like urban Oakland is harder to sell, there are evidently also more vacant unused lots to be utilized for such purposes as the author shows. Perhaps the most refreshing thing about this book is that it is an encounter with an obvious “left wing socialist” type, the type that normally would get involved with militant vegetarian movements–and yet she is an avowed meat-eater who isn’t afraid to kill and butcher her own food, just like humans have done for millenia, and still must do in order to survive in good health. The sections on urban gardening occur throughout the entire account; the first one-third of the book is also devoted to raising poultry for meat; the middle third of the book is devoted to raising rabbits for meat; for this reader, however, a drawback occurs with the final third of the book, which is dedicated to the raising of pigs and the eating of pork. The writing style and the interesting anecdotes are still present for this last part, yes it is still as intriguing as the rest of the book, but this reader has no interest in eating that ”other white meat” (note: pork is 50% fat and can make humans sick with the flu as well).

Rating: Δ Δ Δ
1/2012