TRAITORS AND CARPETBAGGERS IN THE PROMISED LAND by Barry Chamish

by JF

REVIEW: Exclusive Info in Raw Journal Form
As the subtitle implies, this small book is really a raw journal, not integrated prose, and as such it makes for a quick but rather disjointed, herky-jerky read. That’s the bad.

The good is that the inchoate content contains some exclusive information, something for which the maverick journalist Israeli Chamish has become somewhat renowned. It is already known that Chamish intensely denounces the current rulers (and heirs to the founders) of the modern nation of Israel–whom he calls “labor zionists” for reasons which shall be discussed in another book review–as something very akin to an oligarchy of gangsters; also that Shimon Peres is evermore fingered as the current leading labor zionist gangster in all of Israel. All right, so if you’ve heard Chamish interviewed, if you’ve read other books or articles by him, you know that those are his consistent charges; and of course the same charges are made in this journal (I won’t say book; it’s not really a book!).

But this journal gets more specific about Peres and his backdoor dealings with the Vatican, and these tidbits of journal entries are really what make this journal sporadically intriguing. The basics of Chamish’s charges in this journal are this: In 1993, at the Oslo Peace Accords, Shimon Peres secretly sold out his nation when he gave the title deed to the city of Jerusalem in exchange for official recognition of Israel by the Vatican. Did you get that? According to Barry Chamish the Vatican, as of 1993, has control over the city of Jerusalem. This factors huge in global politics, in realm of religion; but more salient is how portentous this almost certainly is in the context of biblical eschatology.

And the American mainstream news was and remains silent about this deal. Gosh. Go figure, huh?

And the American ecumenicalized evangelical leaders were and remain silent about this deal. Gosh. Go figure, huh?

Look, reading this book–I mean journal–went quickly, but I must say it was an unsettling read. Raw journals are just too haphazard for me to read and get any page-turning rhythmic satisfaction. It was great info and I’m looking forward to reading more of Barry Chamish’s books–his more integrated, more fully conceptualized books–but I’m really not into reading the journal or diary form.

Rating: Δ Δ Δ
7/2007

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